e-book A Cowboy Detective

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online A Cowboy Detective file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with A Cowboy Detective book. Happy reading A Cowboy Detective Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF A Cowboy Detective at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF A Cowboy Detective Pocket Guide.
Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Frank Morn is a professor of criminal justice at Illinois State University and author of The Eye That Never Sleeps: A History of.
Table of contents



Oct 07, David rated it really liked it Shelves: Siringo relocated to Chicago, having won some fame with his biography. He was outraged by the Haymarket bombing and vowed to fight Anarchism by joining the Pinkertons. His experience as a cowboy led him to be assigned to the Denver office under McParland, the guy that broke the Molly Maguires. Siringo was a specialist in undercover investigations and was often in considerable danger. Okay, this book is really silly, since it's an autobigraphy written in a time before fact checking, Charlie Siringo is the most bad ass dude to ever live, he is always with the hottest women, he always hits his mark, he's the best looking dude in any room, he is infallible.

Obviously, this is BS, but it sure is entertaining. And, even though some of it is BS, some of it is true, too, and Siringo doesn't do a good enough job of blurring the distinction, so it's easy to separate the wheat from the Okay, this book is really silly, since it's an autobigraphy written in a time before fact checking, Charlie Siringo is the most bad ass dude to ever live, he is always with the hottest women, he always hits his mark, he's the best looking dude in any room, he is infallible. And, even though some of it is BS, some of it is true, too, and Siringo doesn't do a good enough job of blurring the distinction, so it's easy to separate the wheat from the chaff.

If you're looking for a fun weekend read, check out this book. Jun 30, N.

A Cowboy Detective: A True Story Of Twenty-Two Years With a World Famous Detective Agency

The tendency or trend at the time was to exaggerate one's accomplishments - often see Sarah Bernhardt to the extent of patent fantasy - for effect. I can't, at this late date and without extensive research, say whether or not Siringo's memoir fits neatly into this niche or not, but to his credit, it reads as a realistic, down-to-earth record of actual events, if mostly those which would do his reputation credit. One reads a work of this nature for Adventure! But it's much more: The author proves to be a gifted storyteller, whose pacing, often genius-level use of segues, and humorous inclusion of Cowboy expressions make for an enjoyable read.

Siringo seems not to have outspokenly demeaned others on basis of race or origin, but there are stereotypical descriptions and language which may be offensive. Hunting is described within the text, though, with the exception of one buffalo hunt, it's fairly matter-of-fact and not graphic. There is also kindness, as Siringo portrays himself as an animal lover and had many pets to whom he fondly refers throughout the text.

The Pinkerton organization was understandably disturbed at Siringo's recounting of cases he had worked during his career with the agency, and in fact blocked publication, until all references to "the Pinkertons" were replaced with a euphemism "the Dickensons". At this late date, the distinction may seem humorous, but to the fan of history: I'd like to also add: For myself, knowing that this was the process and that I, as a consequence, was able to read this delightful work for less than a buffalo nickel , it wasn't a distraction.

In short, if this sounds like something you would like, I think you will like it. You can get it for free; give it a try. I find it interesting that the catching up with felons and investigation of a crime were outsourced to private companies then. He had mostly proceeded to the suspects to win their friendhips having adopted different names pretending to be sometimes a mining man or other time a buyer of steer and so on. And if he had seen someone who were familiar he would have pretended to have never met him be I don't know when FBI was established, but the hero of the book had done what FBI detectives do today.

And if he had seen someone who were familiar he would have pretended to have never met him before. The plan always worked. However I sense most of the details were omitted not to give a bad impression on the readers. I didn't understand if he had used his notorious Colt 45 to kill a man or gained illegal money which he might need to buy his ranch or spend nice times with women. However it is worth to read to find out this part of the U. What an interesting account of a cowboy detective in a 20 year part of history we never hear about. The words, phrases, and thoughts are very much indicative of the time.

Some of the writing is politically incorrect for this day and time. The plan always worked. However I sense most of the details were omitted not to give a bad impression on the readers.

I didn't understand if he had used his notorious Colt 45 to kill a man or gained illegal money which he might need to buy his ranch or spend nice times with women. However it is worth to read to find out this part of the U. Wish I could have ridden with him sometimes but glad I wasn't there at other times. One person found this helpful. Disappointing - Dry matter of fact reporting of his activity. Not very exciting writing even tho' the subject matter could be!

I was expecting better. Perhaps okay for history buffs who want to know these things - but I read for "entertainment" not basic history. Some of it was interesting but most of it had far too little information. It recounted just about everything he ever did and where, but very little insight into the times. It would have been better if he could have picked out his best adventures and really told us all the details and his thoughts on the times in which he lived.


  • Charlie Siringo - Wikipedia.
  • Where Did My Libido Go??
  • What Every Man Really Needs!: (The mens guide to better eating and more sex).

I skipped over big parts that were written like a travel itinerary. Maybe because I've lived and traveled throughout the west, maybe because i am fascinated with the post civil war period in American history, or maybe because this is a fascinating read, I really enjoyed this book.

It provides a different perspective than one usually gets on the Pinkerton oops Dickinson agency's efforts regarding the union violence of the late nineteenth century. Could more details be provided, yes, but then the book would be huge.

Charlie Siringo

Like my late grandfather, I suspect Mr Siringo can be a little elastic with the facts; however, overall this has the ring someone who has been there and done that. First of all I found this a very entertaining book. The format was a little different, but I've encountered the same thing when reading the Tom Horn autobiography he wrote while in jail and one by a former Texas Ranger written in the s.

The first chapter or two was a little hard to get into but after that I couldn't put it down.

Customers who bought this item also bought

It is nonstop, moving from one case to the next and rubbing elbows with some of the famous outlaws and historical characters of the era. Some of it is undoubtedly embellished quite a bit, but nevertheless I highly recommend it to anyone interested in this time in the history of the west. See all reviews. Most recent customer reviews.

Published 1 month ago. Published 2 months ago. Published 3 months ago. Published 5 months ago. Amazon Customer to be a great project. Published 6 months ago.

See a Problem?

Published 7 months ago. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway. Set up a giveaway. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. The Hidden History of the Cowboy West. Pages with related products. See and discover other items: There's a problem loading this menu right now.


  • A Cowboy Detective: A True Story of Twenty-two Years with a World-Famous Detective Agency.
  • The Reawakened (Aspect of Crow, Book 4).
  • .
  • Miracles.

Get fast, free shipping with Amazon Prime. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations. View or edit your browsing history. Get to Know Us. English Choose a language for shopping.

Catalog Record: A cowboy detective, a true story of | Hathi Trust Digital Library

A year later, it was published, to wide acclaim, and became one of the first true looks into life as a cowboy written by someone who had actually lived the life. In , bored with the mundane life of a merchant, Siringo moved to Chicago , where first-hand observation of the city's labor conflict which he attributed to foreign anarchism moved him to join the Pinkerton Detective Agency , using gunman Pat Garrett 's name as a reference to get the job, having met Garrett several years before.

With 2, active agents and 30, reserves, the forces of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency were larger than the nation's standing army in the late 19th century. The Pinkertons provided services for management in labor disputes, including armed guards and secret operatives like Charles A. He was immediately assigned several cases, which took him as far north as Alaska and as far south as Mexico City.

He began operating undercover , a relatively new technique at the time, and infiltrated gangs of robbers and rustlers , making more than arrests. In the early s he found himself assigned to office work in the Denver office of the agency, work which he greatly despised. During that time, he worked with noted Pinkerton agent, gunman and later assassin Tom Horn. He greatly admired Horn's talents and skills in tracking down suspects, but reflected later that Horn had a dark side that could easily be accessed when need be.

In , Siringo was assigned to a case in Idaho , where he went undercover , working as a miner to feed union information to the employers. Siringo at first turned down the assignment, telling his boss, James McParland, that he sympathized with the union miners. McParland later asked him to go anyway, with the agreement that Siringo could leave if he still felt the same way after seeing the situation. Siringo infiltrated the union, and decided that the leadership was in the hands of anarchists, and so stayed on the job. Despite his dislike for the leadership of the Western Federation of Miners WFM , whom he called anarchists, he also stood against a lynch mob to protect the WFM's attorney Clarence Darrow from being hanged.

In the late s, posing as "Charles L. Carter", an alleged gunman on the run from the law for a murder , he infiltrated outlaw Butch Cassidy 's Train Robbers Syndicate. For more than a year, using information he would gather, he severely hampered the operations of Cassidy's Wild Bunch gang, but without a large number of arrests. After they committed the now-famous train robbery near Wilcox, Wyoming , in which they robbed a Union Pacific train, he again found himself assigned to capture the Wild Bunch.

Horn was able to obtain vital information from explosives expert Bill Speck that revealed to investigators who the suspects were who had killed Sheriff Josiah Hazen, [6] who had been shot and killed during the pursuit of the robbers. Several members of the gang were captured as a result of information Siringo gathered, including Kid Curry , who escaped but was again cornered and killed during a shootout with law enforcement in Colorado.

It was Siringo's information that help track him down on both occasions. They were later allegedly killed by Bolivian police in a shootout there following a mine payroll robbery. During the work on the Wilcox train robbery, Siringo first came into contact with lawman Joe Lefors , who later would arrest Horn for a murder that resulted in Horn's conviction and subsequent hanging. The verdict remains in contention to this day.

Siringo crossed paths with Lefors several years later while working on other cases. Siringo found Lefors incompetent, at best, and greatly despised him.