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Editorial Reviews. From School Library Journal. Adult/High School—Wolff allows that several Buy How Lincoln Learned to Read: Twelve Great Americans and the Educations That Made Them: Read 19 Kindle Store Reviews - wesatimunogo.cf
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Belle is Sojourner Truth. That she managed to bring any kind of positive message to anyone is incredible.

Abe Lincoln is another one where a lot of myths are broken. His story only covers his early life before he is That's plenty since so much has been written about him. How the woman, the absolute central star of the family was ever looked down upon is beyond me. Well, I suppose thanks are in order. Henry Ford is an icon, of course. That's kind of scary in some ways, comforting in others. One sized didn't fit all, but it creates an instant bond with most others around my age.

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This chapter actually spends as much or more time focusing on Annie, her teacher, though. I liked that as it shows more on the thought behind tailoring education to individual needs. Rachel Carson, is the author of Silent Spring , the book that kicked up the environmental movement in the 60's. It had been going for a while. A great contrast for so many of the other stories here. While he was raised in affluence, in many ways his childhood was the most rigid. Elvis Presley's education was of the least interest to me.

Overall, it is a super read. I'm a bit disappointed by some of the people that weren't covered, but I'm sure it was from lack of space. I would have liked to learn more about John Dewey. Reading this author's account of Booker T. I can't recommend it highly enough. View all 14 comments. Aug 28, Jan "don't blame me, I also voted for Hillary" rated it really liked it Shelves: This nonfiction showcased twelve great Americans and the education that gave them what they needed to know: Many lived comfortably as children, one was enslaved, and several were impoverished. It was fascinating reading about their4 schooling and how they learned This nonfiction showcased twelve great Americans and the education that gave them what they needed to know: It was fascinating reading about their4 schooling and how they learned what they needed to know to be successful.

Feb 28, Mike rated it liked it Shelves: Oct 10, Jo rated it really liked it Shelves: I started reading this for NF book group theme: My rating is probably a touch higher than this book deserves. The central thesis about education in America is a little vague - especially evident in the prologue and the closing paragraphs of each chapter. BUT I found this really helpful as an overview of American history, dipping into the details of 12 famous people's lives, arrange I started reading this for NF book group theme: BUT I found this really helpful as an overview of American history, dipping into the details of 12 famous people's lives, arranged chronologically from before the founding of the country Ben Franklin to the nearly-modern era Elvis.

The 12 people come from varied places and cultures within the country and we follow them through their childhoods, until an approximate graduation age though few of them actually went through a school and received a diploma.

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I didn't know much about the backgrounds of any of these people, although I know where they ended up, and these stories were just enough to have a really good sense of who they were and where they came from without reading a detailed biography of each. The chronological order was helpful in telling the story of the country's history too - showing how each generation built upon what had gone before and how the country shifted, again without having to read a very detailed history of each region and culture. I have some background in American history, but this book let me dig into some of the more specific stories of what it means to be an American.

Over and over we encounter the myth of the self-taught, self-made man, a man of the people, that hides the privilege of being born white and male and having access to a more or less decent education and also the luck and strategy and striving and work that these men put into becoming something more or different than they were.

I'm not really sure what this book says about education - that people learn what they need to know to get ahead in their lives if they're destined to become prominent leaders? That even a small amount of education can be leveraged into something more? That education is highly contested and political and what and how we learn reinforces the limits society places on what we can be?

That there is no one understanding of "well educated" but that society tends to reward those already privileged with an education that will further cement their position? Many people in this book did get ahead and make something more of themselves than one might expect, but they are the people who ended up being written about in the history books, the exceptions that prove the rule.

How Lincoln Learned to Read - wesatimunogo.cf

If anything this book taught me that American education isn't very good and never has been and that we don't necessarily know why we teach or how and the purposes of schooling probably have little to do with some pure notion of education anyway. Feb 10, Sterlingcindysu rated it really liked it Shelves: DuBois was fortunate to be born in Massachusetts, where education was mandatory for 6- to year-olds, black or white. Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins, a Paiute Indian, opened her own Indian school, striving to keep the traditional ways alive in the face of white-run schools trying to exterminate Indian traditions.

I really don't know what the writer was trying to "prove" here. I learned alot about growing-up years of the Americans he selected during the times when high school or elementary schools didn't exist. But I don't know if he was trying to show that these people succeeded because of their education, or they were lucky based on their geography, parents, etc. For example, would Jack Kennedy have succeeded without such an emphasis on sports in his education? In other words, does education make the man, or does the man pick the education to make him great?

I'm glad he picked Abigail Adams, because a woman had to be incredibly smart to running a house and farm back then. I grew up about 5 miles from where Rachel Carson did, and I knew nothing about her and the pollution wasn't much improved in the '60s. I had no idea about Helen Keller's educational route. So I learned something and it made me think great criteria for any book.


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But the writing was a bit dry in areas, so I knocked a star off. It was a relatively short book lots of footnotes at the end , so I think he could have spent another 50 pages putting more energy and color in it. Examples of teaching materials actual pages , photos of the schools and writing samples or homework submissions would have helped here. Dec 19, ladydusk rated it really liked it. I really enjoyed How Lincoln Learned to Read.

KIRKUS REVIEW

The book is a history of 12 Americans, or soon-to-be Americans, and the manner in which they gained the knowledge and skills that would become necessary for them to complete the role they would fulfill in their adult lives. Perhaps what is most fascinating to me is the variety of methods Most of the children profiled by Wolff are familiar to us adults; in fact, the only one I'd never heard of before was Rachel Carson who had as close to a Charlotte Mason Nature Study early education as anyone in the book. It was fascinating to see what sort of educational background had produced such exceptional adults who had a task to accomplish.

To see the work that was put into, say, Elvis' meteoric, accidental rise to fame and fortune. All of the people profiled here had intelligence; perception; talent; ability; a fascination; and perhaps, most importantly, drive. Wolff, and even the people he profiles in his book, would not I think recognize God's providence, yet each story reinforced to me just that. For example, Henry Ford was a tinkerer as a child, interested in how machinery worked, was intuitive about the machinery He was the right person, had the right history, to start Ford Motor Company.

The book makes me ask questions, not necessarily about the people profiled here. What fascination do I have? And, perhaps, more importantly, what fascination do my children have? Where do we want them to end up? How do we instill a sense of urgency and drive in them? Do we want to? It took me several weeks to read this, not a difficult read but sometimes not as engrossing as it might have been. Mar 05, Phayvanh rated it did not like it Shelves: The first chapter, on Ben Franklin, is one of the most engaging mini-bios I've ever read.

Then it all goes downhill from there. I stopped reading mid-way through the Abe Lincoln chapter, and never convinced myself to pick it back up. My main frustration with that story was that I didn't know that the former president's grandfather had the same name, and the author spoke about them both.

This book is a scattered and snarky report on a dozen different "great Americans", most of whom many already have The first chapter, on Ben Franklin, is one of the most engaging mini-bios I've ever read. This book is a scattered and snarky report on a dozen different "great Americans", most of whom many already have been the subjects of bios and other study. I was deeply disappointed by the Abigail Adams chapter.

He quotes her and says, " hard to believe that the person who wrote this sentence was wholly neglected", as if to say she was. Then a whole 9 pages elapses BEFORE he tells us she's been homeschooled, had access to a wealthy library, and could possibly have been afforded boarding at a private school. The author describes different stages of her life as her "grade school", her "high school", as if these stages were the only way an education could be broken down. This author is obviously not an educator. At one point AFTER he'd taken great pains to tell us how horrible the school of slavery is , he states that her education "hadn't been all that different from Nabby [Abigail: Young black slaves are not at all different from rich white chicks.

This author is definitely not a woman. I would have rather read a book about lesser known characters. Perhaps a wider range of characters would have made up for it. Where are the Asians? It had great premise. Needed a great editor. Jul 14, Stacy rated it really liked it. This book shouldn't have been called How Lincoln Learned to Read, though, because many of the tales inside of this book are MUCH more interesting than his.

Found this book at my library's "autodidactical" section and was not disappointed. I took notes extensively in some parts. The author is very well researched and I was absolutely delighted at how much care he took to use original quotes from their original sources. Although his casual use of their "nicknames" at first annoyed me, I could see why they were used - in order to make these "Great Names" into real people again - real people who came from humble beginnings and whose various educations could be imitated by other, lesser-known people, like the common reader of this book.

I would like to add that, after reading some others' reviews, the opening and conclusion to this book were not really needed; at a page long or so, they were not solid at all, and definitely not solid enough to link twelve very different people. Still, within the book, I could see where the author was trying to link each different person to their established family and settings, and tried to give the reader the whole picture of the person in question's "education.


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How Lincoln Learned to Read is a book about the education of twelve famous Americans. He gives examples of a broad category of how people are educated through their own initiative, interests, and work. While interesting and well written, I would have to ask, so what? There is no real purpose to this book.

Du Bois, a single, fascinating narrative emerges. It connects the illiterate Sojourner Truth to the privileged Jack Kennedy, takes us from Paiute Indians scavenging on western deserts to the birth of Henry Ford's assembly line. And as the book traces the education we value - both in and outside the classroom - it becomes a history of key American ideas.


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In the end, How Lincoln Learned to Read delivers us to today's headlines. What makes this work particularly captivating is that music historian Wolff 4th of July, Asbury Park: A History of the Promised Land , , etc. Rather, his interest is in how they learned—that is, the life experiences that helped transform them into the figures they became.

Taught to read by his mother at home, Abraham Lincoln received little in the way of formal education. Helen Keller excelled, the author convincingly argues, because she was allowed to create her own curriculum with teacher Annie Sullivan. Kennedy, a poor student in prep school, learned how to be a leader by forming an on-campus club of rebels and iconoclasts.