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The Kings of Eternity has ratings and 33 reviews. Mark said: Last year I read a half dozen books by Eric Brown, and he very quickly became one of my.
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At times it is as bland as a plain rice cake. I never found any real attachment or any reason to even like any of our protagonists. This book lacked any real hurtles other than the obligatory assassin scenes. The prose like the story was sufficient. This is a book that could have been better had it gone more towards the 30's noir type novel. It could have been great as a scifi adventure if that plot line was followed. Heck, Brown could have mad this one go hard science fiction by having Jonathon receive more goods from Jasper.

The writing too me needed a more grounded focus. At times I liked it, for example: Jonathon is asked by Al,"A novelist? If one introduced oneself as an air-line pilot, would the other person then ask,'Have you ever flown a plane? This short scifi light novel might appeal to new readers or to the young adult crowd. One of the best SF novels of The Kings of Eternity is the type of SF novel that should appeal to many readers. The same goes for Daniel, though I did enjoy his company more.

As I implied, this is all the more enjoyable since those characters are so alive and believable. As always, review excerpt links to full review at SFFWorld. Jun 17, Caroline Ingvaldsen rated it liked it.

Intriguing science fiction flawed by a incompletely conceived extraterrestrial plot juxtaposed with an engaging terrestrial storyline. Aug 15, Tagra rated it liked it. I almost gave up on this book several times. I was just done with it. I didn't particularly like the character, it kept jumping back and forth between two time periods and my lack of interest in the character made it difficult to follow in one time period there is a girlfriend named Carla and in the other there is one named Caroline, and I'm bad with names so I kept getting them crossed with each other which ma I almost gave up on this book several times.

I didn't particularly like the character, it kept jumping back and forth between two time periods and my lack of interest in the character made it difficult to follow in one time period there is a girlfriend named Carla and in the other there is one named Caroline, and I'm bad with names so I kept getting them crossed with each other which made his seeming degree reactions toward them very confusing , but worst of all the language in the book was almost pretentious to read.

I had heard the term 'purple prose' before and I even remember looking it up once and thinking "aha, that is the name for that" but then forgetting again. This book is purple prose. I don't think I will forget the meaning of it again, after this. There is even a section in the book that I highlighted where a character reads out a section of writing from the main characters books who is also an author, naturally and criticizes it for being "Interesting, if a little overwritten.

I was about to give up on it and went back to the blurb on it to remember why I had even loaded it on my kindle in the first place, and went "Oh. That does sound interesting. Maybe I'll keep going for a little more They have an encounter with an alien creature, save him, and are rewarded with some gifts in return.

One of those gifts is the gift of immortality more or less via what is not explained as but is almost certainly some form of nano-medical-technology. Now they must deal with the fact that they will outlive everyone else. Who do they give it to? How will they conceal their non-aging properties? Use of the technology is forbidden There were a lot of things that I picked up on and I wasn't sure if they were intentional or not.

A lot of things are repeated. In a lot of cases it seems like it could be an attempt to signal something significant, but in other cases I was genuinely not sure if the author just forgot they had done that already. For example, the author in the book writes a story about a reclusive author living in Greece who is finally charmed by a woman and brought out of his solitude. Guess what happens to the character! In exactly the same town as the book he wrote! That can't just be a coincidence. But then certain descriptive phrases were used repetitively, like the one about heat hitting their skin like a physical blow.

It's actually a plot point in the book that the author is accused of plagiarism because he accidentally re-uses phrases from books he penned under different names. Are these repetitive phrases some sort of nod to that or just a mistake of editing? Would there be a point to adding a nod to that?? It went over my head if there is one. And I noticed an odd tendency to over-explain things, but only the things that really didn't need any explanation whatsoever. To make it even more irritating, when something actually needed explaining, it would be glossed over. But if you ever wondered how an object got from one end of the room to the other, hoo boy nothing was left to imagination!

Except then sometimes it wouldn't be explained and suddenly it was glaringly obvious that an object that had previously been described as on that side of the room was being picked up by a character on this side of it. Ironically, the breaks in continuity wouldn't have been an issue at all if it weren't for the anal over-description of everything else.

There were times when I was absolutely positive I could see the author re-reading the scene and then going "Crap, what if someone asks about this," and adding a bunch of extraneous descriptive text to head off any pedantic questions, then forgetting that it impacted a scene later on.

Why is it that the Vark are eradicated and sent running across most of the galaxy, and yet they still feel it necessary to dispatch assassins for three wayward troublemakers on a backward planet that doesn't even qualify for the union? Come the fuck on. It made a bit of sense if you didn't think too hard when they were an all powerful force and were flexing their muscles in some sort of display of a quasi-religious fanaticism of wanting to control all technology use, but I found it way too difficult to swallow at the end there. There were so many parallels between the two time periods that I thought he was going to go for the "get close to you using a lover" tactic a second time and goad him into revealing his second dose of serum with her illness.


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Basically the instant they revealed the detection doodad didn't work any more and anyone could be the spy I was like "Oh no, Caroline. See, doesn't this just make more sense than the actual ending already?? I was so positive that I was actually shocked when the spy was killed and Caroline was still waiting for him at home.

The Kings of Eternity by Eric Brown

But it sure would have been a depressing ending that way. Feb 02, Richard rated it it was amazing Shelves: An engaging story with early and late sections interleaved, turns into a thriller. Some familiar themes for Sci-Fi readers, but with a new mix. Feb 21, Super Marge rated it it was amazing. A beautiful story that I wished wouldn't come to an end. This is the second book of Eric Brown's that I have read and both were just superb. Read this book and you won't be disappointed. Jul 05, Marcin rated it really liked it. I love Eric Brown.

Here, I give only 4 stars because there was too much romance and not enough sci-fi elements. Although when they appear, they are really amazing - as always in Eric's books. Feb 26, Les rated it it was amazing. The story is told from two quite different viewpoints, one a first person account, the other a third person narrative and they combine along the way into a solid story of happiness and pain, wonder and intrigue. All of these stories have at their core some sort of benevolent alien species that can bestow wonderful yet ominous gifts upon human recipients.

I very much wanted to be one of the characters in this book, I connected with it on such a level. A must-read for any lover of story.

The Kings of Eternity by Eric Brown

My first foray into Eric Brown work, and based on what I read here, to be followed soon by more, if they are as good as The Kings of Eternity. The main appeal for me was the transgenre appeal. The story goes beyond the immediate adventure of first contact and space battle epics.

In fact these are secondary to character study, and the main character's search for love, for the meaning of life, for how to deal with his suddenly extraordinary circumstances. The different threads woven into the story a My first foray into Eric Brown work, and based on what I read here, to be followed soon by more, if they are as good as The Kings of Eternity. The different threads woven into the story are well integrated, trasitting smoothly back and forth in time, focusing more on relations between characters and less on trying to establish scientific explanations for the various techno gadgets.

As far as prose go, I was reminded of some of John Fowles novels, probably because of the Greek Island setting.

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What I'm left with after the last scene, beyond the technical accomplishment of a well written story, is the message of hope that I'm sure the author intended tu accentuate. It is mentioned in the text, in one of the friendly discussions at the manor about the role of literature, and it reminds me why I love science fiction so much: SF, or scientific romance, is the genre of looking forward, of dreaming the future into reality. The recurring image of the small siluettes against a huge night sky is as powerful as the famous line from Space Oddisey: My God, it's full of stars!

I'm certain the Kings of Eternity fancied themselves to be quite something. The only thing I would say is they were dependably bland. I had high hopes for this book and it just didn't reach those heights. Slightly up, slightly down, but never so far in either direction to force me to keep turning pages. It was almost a book without conflict. Even the most important choices in the book are delivered in such a way to minimize their impact.

I'm not going to give anything away, but there were many ti I'm certain the Kings of Eternity fancied themselves to be quite something. I'm not going to give anything away, but there were many times while I was reading that I thought, "that's the part I want to see! Why didn't he write that bit!?! The part that I think frustrates me the most is that the writing and language use is really good. It was an easy, smooth, flowing read. Despite or maybe because things didn't happen to these characters I kept flying through the pages looking for something to pop up. I think this could be described as a comfortable book.

No worries, things will just glide along smoothly, even when the characters should be quite upset. They'll open another liquor bottle and fix things right up! I've got to say this book lands around two and a half stars - it was ok, but might slide right out of memory. May 26, Willy Eckerslike rated it did not like it Shelves: I was destined, however, to be disappointed. Wells or Jules Verne. Kings of Eternity lacks pace, the narrative is stodgy, the characters are monolithic, the dialogue stilted and the science fiction element is almost non-existent.

If, on the other hand, you like your sci-fi hard, original, thought provoking and operatic then steer clear. Dec 27, Andrew Chamberlain rated it liked it. I suspect Eric Brown thinks of himself as something of a literary writer, and at his best I think he probably is. It was beautifully crafted in the early and middle sections of the book, with compelling and enjoyable plot lines, and characters who were constructed with integrity - although the 'Kings' of the title did seem to spend the first half of the book consuming so much alcohol that they must hav This is the first novel I've ever read by Eric Brown, I'm glad I bought it and I did enjoy it.

It was beautifully crafted in the early and middle sections of the book, with compelling and enjoyable plot lines, and characters who were constructed with integrity - although the 'Kings' of the title did seem to spend the first half of the book consuming so much alcohol that they must have been thoroughly rat-arsed whatever they got up to - pass the brandy round again old chap!

If you like your SF hard - in the style of Richard Morgan for example - you may want to give this a wide berth; it is a scientific romance rather than SF I am sure we could debate the definitions but on the whole very good scientific romance for all that. But the style is more ripping yarn than hard boiled. The ending was probably the weakest part of it, one of the characters introduced later on in the book seemed to be rather hastily sketched compared to the finely drawn people we see earlier, and there was a certain predictability about the conclusion.

Still a good read for all that. Jul 18, Ian rated it really liked it. A reclusive writer living on a Greek island in falls in love with the painter who has moved in next to him, but is still reluctant to reveal himself. Four friends in meet at the country home of one of them and in the woods nearby witness the opening of a portal from another world and rescue the creature which comes through it. The link between the two narratives is not difficult to guess, but that doesn't spoil any enjoyment this novel might have.

The narrative set on the Greek island A reclusive writer living on a Greek island in falls in love with the painter who has moved in next to him, but is still reluctant to reveal himself. The narrative set on the Greek island has a somewhat Fowlesian feel to it, though perhaps a little more sentimental than Fowles ever wrote. The other narrative is Wellsian, though it uses Wellsian types tropes with the sophistication of a twenty-first century sf writer.

Is this Brown's best novel? It's certainly a very good novel, however. Jun 28, Vmichelle Skinner rated it liked it Shelves: I found this book on the new sci-fi shelves of Barnes and Noble, and I was intrigued, because it didn't seem to be your typical scifi. I've also been looking for books that treat time travel in some way, although this one didn't exactly. While I enjoyed it, I didn't adore it. It felt a little bit more like a short story than a novel to me, even though it was long.

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But I don't mean that as an insult. I haven't fully processed it yet, to be able to explain that impression. The main protagonist was I found this book on the new sci-fi shelves of Barnes and Noble, and I was intrigued, because it didn't seem to be your typical scifi. The main protagonist was a man and the author is obviously a man and even though I don't mind books with a male POV, this book felt very "male" to me.

Not a raging testosterone male, just male and I feel like maybe that kept me at a distance somehow. It had an interesting premise - and I liked the fact that the main character was a writer! And I loved the settings in Greece and England. Jan 21, Cheryl rated it liked it Shelves: I usually love Eric Brown, but I found this one slow to get into. There were a few great scenes that kept me reading, but it was not until about page that I really got into the story. They find and help a strange creature from another world which changes their lives.

In the writer Daniel Langham lives in Kallithea, on a Greek island, as a recluse. The meeting with Caroline Platt changes things but for him the problem goes far beyond the sentimental issue. In the writer Jonathon Langham and his colleague Edward Vaughan are urgently called by their friend Jasper Carnegie. Something strange is going on in the English countryside and when they go to investigate they discover something that will change their lives in an unpredictable way.

The result is a novel that is a mix of genres in which the science fiction element is sometimes in the background. This can leave the reader puzzled but going forward it becomes clear that this element is crucial. Sometimes it seems almost a mix-up that includes heterogeneous elements but in the end I think it works. Earlier, Eric Brown develops a lot the romantic part of the story with the meeting between Daniel Langham and Caroline Platt in and the problems between Jonathon Langham and his girlfriend in Generally, a start like that would make my interest in the novel drop down very quickly.

The author, however, manages to develop two parallel stories in an evocative manner, going far beyond the romantic element only, thus maintaining my attention. Eric Brown got inspired by a very classic science fiction that may seem outdated.