Get PDF Decoding the Heavens: Solving the Mystery of the Worlds First Computer

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Decoding the Heavens: Solving the Mystery of the Worlds First Computer file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Decoding the Heavens: Solving the Mystery of the Worlds First Computer book. Happy reading Decoding the Heavens: Solving the Mystery of the Worlds First Computer Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Decoding the Heavens: Solving the Mystery of the Worlds First Computer at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Decoding the Heavens: Solving the Mystery of the Worlds First Computer Pocket Guide.
Editorial Reviews. Review. "Though it is more than 2, years old, the Antikythera Mechanism Decoding the Heavens: Solving the Mystery of the World's First Computer - Kindle edition by Jo Marchant. Download it once and read it on your.
Table of contents



The positive aspects are that we learn about so much more than just the mechanism, as well as learning about the mechanism itself in much greater detail than we otherwise would have. I enjoyed this book hugely and learned an enormous amount. It is, at times, technical, but Marchant goes out of her way to explain the many unusual terms and ideas.

Of course, the world is full of other evidence of the advanced abilities of ancient man and crazy explanations abound. If, however, one rejects the concepts of alien beings helping to build the pyramids, for example, one is left with the possibility that, perhaps, ancient man was very intelligent and knew about technologies that have not yet been rediscovered.

This would be in line with a literal understanding of the Bible. However, since neither the alien explanation nor the biblical one fits in with the general paradigm of our age, the whole issue of anomalous technological artifacts and abilities is often ignored by scholars. Be that as it may, Marchant sums up her perspective in this profound ending to her book: After all, where we see practical machinery that can measure time accurately and do work, the Greeks saw a way to gain knowledge, demonstrate the beauty of the heavens and get closer to the gods.

Decoding the Heavens by Jo Marchant is the kind of book that would meet the math and science reading requirement in our homeschool high school. My review makes the book sound philosophical, and it is at times, but it is also quite technical and a lot of fun. Nov 03, Linda Robinson rated it it was amazing. Three encrusted bronze fragments collected from a wreck along the coast of Antikythera in by Greek sponge divers in a tiny boat, languished in a cardboard box in the National Archeological Museum in Athens for decades.

The Antikythera mechanism may be the first analog computer, built about 80 BC. This predates clockwork mechanisms in wide public use by millennium, and challenges the long-held belief that such science originated in Europe. Its purity of design and build imply that it is not Three encrusted bronze fragments collected from a wreck along the coast of Antikythera in by Greek sponge divers in a tiny boat, languished in a cardboard box in the National Archeological Museum in Athens for decades.

Its purity of design and build imply that it is not the only one of its kind made, just the only one found. The little mechanism, with gears, pointers, flat discs, slots and pins, and a hand crank, plots the course of the Sun, Moon, known planets, including the observed elliptical orbits and wobbles in their travels.

See a Problem?

And also predicts eclipses - out to 26, years. It combines the Egyptian calendar, the 19 year Metonic cycle and the Saros cycle, a period of 18 years, 11 days and 8 hours; the time between a particular eclipse. Another dial is thought to display the 76 year Callippic cycle, and may have been to track dates of the ancient Olympic games.

Scientists, museum curators and interested others have spent entire careers - some all of their academic life - pursuing the secrets of the Antikythera mechanism. Marchant is a science writer. She was assigned the story by Nature magazine in , and the mechanism clearly fascinated her. The book reads more like a blog post than a scientific paper: Not good scientific reporting, but she sure made an absorbing book! The commentary and intrigue about the Antikythera mechanism, and this book continues at the Antikythera Mechanism Research Project website, which makes for more fascinating reading.

I love the language of researchers, barely struggling to be polite, but writing in such a way that we know the writer means "stupid twit - he's wrong; as wrong as he can be! Makes for fascinating reading. The mechanism will be studied, argued about, and hopefully one day there will be the technology and the money to examine the shipwreck for other pieces that can reveal more puzzle answers. Cousteau's team, diving the wreck in , did not have the equipment to examine the crevasse.

Decoding the Heavens - Wikipedia

What other wonders might these be, sleeping in a dark ocean trench? Jun 22, Christian rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Marchant did a superior job in telling the story of the Antikythera mechanism. Leave it to a science journalist to amply fill in all the background you need and expose the relevant alternative theories to any decision or guess made in this archaeological forensic work. The Antikythera mechanism was a box of machinery discovered in a shipwreck near Greece.

Intellectuals and scientists have been consistently lured to its siren call for one reason: There was no precedent for such an advanced machine to have been created in first century B. Marchant undertakes to explain the significance of this marvel to the completely uninitiated: In explaining the damage this equipment suffered underwater, she touches upon basic chemical reaction, what happens when copper and bronze sit in salt water for over a dozen centuries, and how this reaction further deteriorated the components as it sat in storage.

This builds up a surprising level of dramatic tension, as the quest to uncover this ancient machine's secrets truly is a race against time.

Ed Lake uncovers the story of the Antikythera mechanism, a 2,000-year old piece of clockwork

When it got into the deep math, I was unable to follow this information but could skip past a paragraph or two without losing much. That was a relief. She introduces all the players: We're sympathetic to the vainglorious bastards and we root for the unsung heroes: Marchant does her best to represent each fairly, as well as their relation to each other. She addresses each reasonable theory in good faith, then debunks it as advanced technology and clearer thinkers with better information unravel previously impenetrable clues.

At no point does she assert, "And now we definitely know this about it. This is so much more satisfying, more confidence-inducing, than someone claiming the mystery of the mechanism's origins are conclusively resolved.

Decoding the Heavens: A 2,000-Year-Old Computer and the Century-Long Search to Discover Its Secrets

I daresay this book is rereadable. I could easily see myself returning to it in half a year, to relive the tension and discovery, as well as to study a very competent exposition and storytelling method. The history of the Antikythera Mechanism and the people who became obsessed with it was very interesting. I envy the enthusiasm these individuals showed towards the mechanism but overall I would say it rather negatively impacted their lives. Everything in moderation and such. I also was intrigued by the incorporation of information on diving and the history of archae 3.

I also was intrigued by the incorporation of information on diving and the history of archaeological findings at sea. The importance of translations of knowledge through the ages and the different stages of technology in the world since ancient times was quite frustrating to read. It is a bit disturbing to realize how much more advanced society could be with such a simple change in history the knowledge to create a mechanism like this surviving downfalls of societies. Although, dare I say we could long be gone considering the tragic elements of advancement climate change, threat of nuclear winter etc.

I really enjoyed the history of different inventors and great minds from ancient times to more modern times, such as Archimedes, Hero, Posidonius, Hipparchus, and Aristarchus Copernicus used his theory from the 3rd century BCE to further prove heliocentrism, later Galileo. Speaking of which, it wasn't until that the Catholic Church even admitted Galileo was right. I don't see how anyone can be okay with that, it is completely absurd. One of my only complaints about the book is that some of the mechanical elements described were a bit confusing and were difficult to get a full grasp on, especially as I've always been very visual with details such as those found in the Antikythera Mechanism.

But overall a very intriguing book that makes me wonder yet again what else there is yet to be discovered, if ever discovered the saddest possibility. Top notch book that chronicles the discovery and decipherment of a device that proves to the modern world that assumptions about the low level of technical achievement in the ancient world are very wrong. I first read about the Antikythera mechanism in an article written by Tony Freeth who is profiled in the book. I am amazed by the scientific knowledge that the mechanism embodies: A definite must read.

Definately an interesting book in what it contains rather than the book itself. The mechanism gives an insight into the possibilities that might have existed, and also totally changed the way that I saw the ancient world. I, like most people used to tend to think of the ancient world as this place where the most advanced science and tech was a rather nice plumbing and heating system that we caught up to technologically in the 14th century.

Product details

This book reminds us all that in reality, the ancients re Definately an interesting book in what it contains rather than the book itself. This book reminds us all that in reality, the ancients really did go alot furthur up the technological tree than we give them credit for.

The writing is acceptable, if a little dry at times. But thats totally acceptable, given at times this was a topic that literally 3 people on earth really were really paying attention to. The book also gives us a little pause to remember that you can go quite far with technology, and still fall so far back that it takes 2 millenia to catch up. Hopefully, we won't let the mistake happen again. This is a combination Roman-era history work, archaeological study, mathematical analysis, and detective novel, all rolled into one -- but written more engagingly than any book of history, archaeology, math or forensic analysis.

Marchant studies what is now known as the "Antikythera mechanism", a remarkable archaeological find dating back to BC. After more than a century of on-again, off-again study, scholars finally in concluded that it is an extremely sophisticated astronomical comp This is a combination Roman-era history work, archaeological study, mathematical analysis, and detective novel, all rolled into one -- but written more engagingly than any book of history, archaeology, math or forensic analysis. After more than a century of on-again, off-again study, scholars finally in concluded that it is an extremely sophisticated astronomical computer.

It completely upends centuries of research that has assumed that the Greeks, apart from a handful of scholars such as Euclid, Archimedes and Aristarchus, were relatively backward scientifically. Marchant has done her homework well, and has written her topic in a very readable yet uncompromising style. Apr 04, David rated it it was amazing Shelves: Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


  • No Place To Hide (Mills & Boon Intrigue) (Silhouette Intimate Moments).
  • What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?.
  • Final Cut Pro Workflows: The Independent Studio Handbook!
  • Part Six: Decoding the Heavens: Solving the mystery of the World's First Computer.
  • Spirit Poems!
  • Navigation menu;

Would you like to tell us about a lower price? Learn more about Amazon Prime. Read more Read less. Kindle Cloud Reader Read instantly in your browser.

Product details File Size: Cornerstone Digital August 18, Publication Date: August 18, Sold by: Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. This is a combination Roman-era history work, archaeological study, mathematical analysis, and detective novel, all rolled into one -- but written more engagingly than any book of history, archaeology, math or forensic analysis.

Marchant studies what is now known as the "Antikythera mechanism", a remarkable archaeological find dating back to BC. After more than a century of on-again, off-again study, scholars finally in concluded that it is an extremely sophisticated astronomical computer. It completely upends centuries of research that has assumed that the Greeks, apart from a handful of scholars such as Euclid, Archimedes and Aristarchus, were relatively backward scientifically.

Marchant has done her homework well, and has written her topic in a very readable yet uncompromising style. Excellent look at the Antikythera mechanism and how to pronounce it ;- and all the implications. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase.

Decoding the Heavens: Solving the mystery of the Worlds First Computer Jo Marchant

And it is a true story. You usually have to go to fiction for a story like this. Thank you for making it available to general public. Solving the mystery of the world's first computer by Josephine Marchant. Once you start reading this book it is very hard to put it down. Read more Read less. Prime Book Box for Kids. What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Sponsored products related to this item What's this? Discover how these five Native American tribes were removed from their lands. A true story of mental illness, mass murder and aviation disaster.

Written by the Air Force cop who ended the killing spree at a military hospital. Selected and Edited by M Napoleon's art of war. His original thoughts on the art of war and leadership. Do you want to learn about the Olmecs but don't feel like reading a boring textbook? This captivating history book could be the answer. A young woman's journey of self-discovery and how she survived the Na A different kind of military memoir and naval history where women, warships, scandal and a diary-honest psychological journey all take center stage.

How did we get to where we are today? Discover the epic events that shaped our world in this best seller. Review "Though it is more than 2, years old, the Antikythera Mechanism represents a level that our technology did not match until the 18th century, and must therefore rank as one of the greatest basic mechanical inventions of all time. Windmill July 1, Language: Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video.

Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. This is a combination Roman-era history work, archaeological study, mathematical analysis, and detective novel, all rolled into one -- but written more engagingly than any book of history, archaeology, math or forensic analysis.

Marchant studies what is now known as the "Antikythera mechanism", a remarkable archaeological find dating back to BC. After more than a century of on-again, off-again study, scholars finally in concluded that it is an extremely sophisticated astronomical computer.

It completely upends centuries of research that has assumed that the Greeks, apart from a handful of scholars such as Euclid, Archimedes and Aristarchus, were relatively backward scientifically.