Read PDF Your Puppy, Your Dog: A Kids Guide to Raising a Happy, Healthy Dog

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You'll have all the information you need to confidently raise a happy, healthy, an introductory guide for children and their parents, Your Puppy, Your Dog Popular author of Your Puppy, Your Dog, Pat Storer has designed her book to guide.
Table of contents



Dunbar talks about the importance of crate training, bite inhibition, and socialization in puppyhood. So, the puppy ended up finding a better home with someone who could crate train him properly, had the requisite experience and understood how to read and treat a dog. My point is that Dunbar's instructions are unimpeachable. Use them if you want a happy, healthy, and well-behaved dog. Or, like me, you may realize you don't have what it takes to have one, because by reading Dunbar you will know exactly what needs to be done to have one. Dunbar offers most of the instructions as free PDFs online, but it's worth getting the book if you can.

Oct 02, Andie Murray rated it really liked it Shelves: This was a good primer for raising a puppy, with good positive reinforcement training techniques. Dunbar is a well-respected trainer and seems to really understand dogs and how they think. However, I was irritated that Dunbar really never offerred any advice for what you should do if your dog does't respond the way his theoretical dog did. For example, he would say "hold the treat above his head and say 'Puppy, sit'. Your puppy will sit his butt down on the floor to get a better look at the trea This was a good primer for raising a puppy, with good positive reinforcement training techniques.

Your puppy will sit his butt down on the floor to get a better look at the treat. There were many instances of this, where the author would tell you what to do, then tell you what your dog would do in response, and then how you should respond to that response.

But no attention was paid to the fact that not every dog is necessarily going to make the expected response, so he doesn't provide any guidance in that scenario. Still a very useful book, but it lost a star for that because it was less useful than it could have been. Mar 15, Sherrie rated it it was amazing Shelves: A must read for anyone who is thinking of getting a puppy. Two caveats however due to new info and updates since it was written.

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He says puppies under 12 weeks shouldn't go to puppy classes. This is no longer the case. He supports taking dogs to dog parks which now most trainers do not recommend - for why go to http: It is now recommended that dayc A must read for anyone who is thinking of getting a puppy. It is now recommended that daycare is better. How to choose a daycare at http: Aug 28, Craig rated it liked it Shelves: I love that Ian Dunbar made this book available for free on his website Dogstar Daily.

The book is filled with practical solutions to problems new dog owners are likely to face such as house training, bite inhibition, chewing, separation anxiety and barking. There are too many well-trained dogs that were rescued and trained as adults for me to agree with that idea. People would be much better prepared reading this book vs. Sep 22, sylas rated it liked it Shelves: Jul 19, Jen Medos rated it it was amazing Shelves: It has so many valuable ideas and a specific timeline on what needs to happen when as far as puppies' development goes.

Science based training and positive reinforcement are the foundations of this book and if you follow these recommendations you will have such a great family member.

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Dog Owner's Guide: How to socialize your puppy

I do have a few criticisms though. One, the average person would have a very hard time doing everything Dr. I definitely understand the intent but we also need to be realistic of the time commitment most people will be willing to give to a puppy. Secondly, I found that the part about dog parks to be incomplete. Dunbar says that ppl with very large and very small dogs tend to end up staying away from dog parks because those dogs are more likely to either be a bully or get bullied and the owners understandably wish to avoid conflict. It is reassuring that he also states most dog fights are a lot of noise and not much else.

However, he leaves the discussion there. So if you are a small dog owner, how are you suppose to mitigate the in my opinion very large risk of taking your dog to the dog park? Overall though, I highly enjoyed this book and will be reading more by him as soon as I am able. Dec 28, Anna rated it it was ok Shelves: I mean, it's fine, and helpful, but pedantic and fear-mongering.

We all make mistakes. One accident is not the undoing of your puppy training program. Possibly I just chafed at the tone because at this point I'm relatively well-read in this area, and it felt condescending and unnecessarily absolutist-- there's more than one right way, but you'd never know it from reading this. That said, I know this is a product of an overwhelming desire on the part of the author to avoid the I mean, it's fine, and helpful, but pedantic and fear-mongering.

That said, I know this is a product of an overwhelming desire on the part of the author to avoid the sort of disasters that happen when unprepared puppy owners get in over their heads and end up surrendering dogs to shelters or worse. He's not wrong that many perfect puppies are ruined by their owners, and we ended up doing things that are similar to much of what he advocates in most cases.

He does have a kong for when he's crated We did not use a puppy toilet. Even in the depths of the Wisconsin winter i. Dunbar's approach to training uses the cue word immediately, even before you're getting a consistent response from the dog with luring. We took an approach advocated by others and made sure the puppy had nailed the behavior on a lure before adding the cue word, hand motion, and gradually removing the lure, so that the command cues would not become diluted. Overall, a useful reference if you can get past the tone. Oct 28, Ren rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is very comprehensive, reasonably up-to-date, and for the most part scientifically sound, so it's no wonder that so many people recommend this book.

The author seems to be very extreme in his advice, saying for instance that you should invite different people to your home, including 20 children, to give the puppy a treat while training them a handful of tricks and handling their mouth, ears, feet, tail, rear, and genital area. Only 25 people a week! I have to believe that he exaggerated This is very comprehensive, reasonably up-to-date, and for the most part scientifically sound, so it's no wonder that so many people recommend this book.

I have to believe that he exaggerated the number to get people to take it seriously enough to invite over as many people as they could, not because you actually need people to do this. I sure hope not! I don't know that many people, let alone that many people I trust to train my dog and would ask to touch their genitals! He also advocates not taking your puppy anywhere other unvaccinated dogs may have been until they are done with their vaccinations at 12 weeks, which is a controversial topic.

Those first 12 weeks are the most critical weeks of a dogs life for learning about the world and others, and today it seems to be more accepted that you need to take calculated risks rather than sequestering your puppy away entirely by the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior among others. While this book is great, I would not recommend it without the caveat that most people agree that the risk of not socializing a puppy before 12 weeks is far worse than the risk of disease, depending on where you live.

Your vet should be able to tell you if there's been a disease breakout in your area. Mar 17, Sarah rated it really liked it. This has been on my to-read list for a loooong time. I didn't know anything about dogs until Faith was not a puppy anymore. Poor Faith had to go through a LOT of mistakes. By the time I realized this was kind of a famous book that I should read, I didn't have very much incentive to read it.

Now I have incentive because I'm getting a puppy! To be honest, I was a little disappointed.

Bringing Home Your New Puppy

There's some great advice in here and I think some not-so-great advice. I liked the parts about bite inhibition This has been on my to-read list for a loooong time. I liked the parts about bite inhibition and the long-term confinement plan. The socialization parts are kind of opposite of the advice in the puppy CU book; I think a happy medium and an owner who understands her puppy are the best bet.

Of course, yesterday I came downstairs to discover that Faith had helped herself to a decorative votive holder that was on the dining room table and destroyed it. So maybe the fact that she peed on the floor about three times when she was a puppy did signal many more mistakes to come! Actually, Faith's belief that anything in her environment is fair game positively punishes me to clean up after myself, which makes me a happier human.

Sometimes we have casualties, though! Jun 18, Deirdre Keating rated it it was amazing Shelves: I love the focus on soft-bite and training a dog to never put his mouth on a human I'm reading a lot of reviews about Dunbar as naive and only part of the story I guess I'll have to wait and see. Apr 02, Rebecca Grace rated it really liked it Shelves: Simple suggestions like making sure I have treats in my pocket so I can INSTANTLY reward outdoor elimination have really sped up the potty training for our two puppies, and I like Dunbar's idea of starting the puppies out in one room of the home, and then waiting until they have gone an entire month without any bathroom or chewing mistakes in that room before adding a second room, then waiting another month with no mistakes before adding a third room, etc.

My dogs are very food-motivated, so the positive treat training is working very well for them. May 23, Sumiko rated it really liked it Shelves: The best thing about this book is that it gives clear developmental guidelines and a training program for the first few months at home. Dunbar stresses that it is imperative to socialize the puppy with humans before 12 weeks, and gives ideas for how to do that Throw puppy parties and have him meet people. Second most imperative is to teach bite inhibition before 16 weeks through puppy playschool.

Dunbar gives some training tips, but I would have preferred more. In that respect, I prefer The best thing about this book is that it gives clear developmental guidelines and a training program for the first few months at home. However, Dunbar's approach to housebreaking and fostering chew-toy-aholism is clearly described and is working well on my new puppy. Aug 22, Dixie rated it liked it. Wonderful book but a little too fierce in some ways - I don't agree with the insistence on "errorless" housetraining so if the baby is on the changing table and you suddenly see the puppy circling by you, is all lost?

I also have trouble with the idea that you must invite people to your house to meet the puppy by the time it is 18 weeks old - the rather cavalier insistence that everyone can find people to invite over sounds like the words of a gregarious man - what about a single woma Wonderful book but a little too fierce in some ways - I don't agree with the insistence on "errorless" housetraining so if the baby is on the changing table and you suddenly see the puppy circling by you, is all lost? I also have trouble with the idea that you must invite people to your house to meet the puppy by the time it is 18 weeks old - the rather cavalier insistence that everyone can find people to invite over sounds like the words of a gregarious man - what about a single woman in a new town?

Or a situation like mine - my husband would divorce me if I invited strangers to our house! May 17, Victoria rated it really liked it. The last of my invaluable puppy books. I love how this one breaks things into 6 key goals of puppy development, which I have been working towards with my dog.


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So far, so good, and I definitely recommend this to anyone getting a puppy, or thinking about getting a puppy since it talks a lot about the before period as well hence the title, though I didn't read it until after I had selected mine. Insightful without being overwhelming.

Pat Storer

It changed my thought process and the way I view the puppy and the relationship instead of listing steps which I liked. I plan to get the next one - After you get your puppy. Great summary of modern training methods Ian writes an entertaining summary of positive reinforcement puppy-training methods. I would recommend this to anyone getting a puppy, whether it is their 1st or 10th.

Mar 20, Amanda rated it it was amazing Shelves: So it's not like compelling literature or anything, but this is the quintessential guide to how to raise a puppy right. It has great advice and it harps on the importance of what needs to be done. Highly recommended for anyone getting a puppy! Feb 12, Tina Grove rated it really liked it. Though it was a bit alarmist, had some really valuable information for starting off right with your puppy.

Apr 26, Tegan rated it it was amazing. Not so great for experienced dog people, but that's not its target audience! Apr 13, Ashley rated it liked it Shelves: The fact that I am not reading this to prepare for a puppy, but rather just because I know it's one of the best respected texts in pet dog training but hadn't read it yet probably colors my view of it. On the one hand, it's full of good advice. It really is one of the better books to introduce you to how to do the very basic puppy training that sets the groundwork for having a dog that you can actually live with.

You won't ruin your dog by following the advice in this book, and I would certainly The fact that I am not reading this to prepare for a puppy, but rather just because I know it's one of the best respected texts in pet dog training but hadn't read it yet probably colors my view of it.

You won't ruin your dog by following the advice in this book, and I would certainly recommend this to friends planning to bring home a pup--especially as an alternative to some of the other popular dog training "authorities" out there here's looking at Cesar Millan and the like.

At the same time, the dire tone of the book needs to be taken with a grain of salt. So, you made a mistake housetraining your pup--clean the carpet and move on, it isn't the end of the world. Yes, each mistake makes it a little harder--but the idea that a single accident in the house is the gateway to a dog allowed to roam free and end its life with a visit to animal control is probably a bit much for most owners. It also does not necessarily reflect a realistic image of how one most commonly brings home a pup--most responsible breeders won't let the buyer choose the puppy preferring instead to match canine and human needs based on their own experience with the litter and the litter's relatives , and most puppies adopted from shelters will not be exactly eight weeks old and raised in a busy kitchen full of all varieties of people from the moment of birth.

Nevertheless, people manage to get exceptional dogs both ways. This should not be your one resource in training your dog, but it's a valuable addition to a small dog training library and one that, paired with other books, is likely to be very useful for anyone planning on bringing home a puppy.

I quite liked this book. There was some repetition, but he warned from the outset that he would reiterate important things. Litters of puppies raised in an isolated location such as a barn, a garage or an isolated dog kennel often have little exposure to humans except those feeding them. If puppies never leave their confined, isolated quarters where they have been raised, they may never experience any external stimuli such as automobiles, strangers, loud noises or children running and playing. Poorly socialized puppies can also result when they have been raised in the wild by an abandoned, female dog.

If these puppies are fortunate enough to be discovered by a human and receive handling while still very young, they have a better chance to trust humans and be less fearful. If they receive no human handling before they are 16 weeks of age, they may grow up to be very fearful adult dogs that are not acceptable family pets. If puppies are not socialized at an early enough age, it makes little difference if they have been raised by a breeder, a private family or in a vacant building; the outcome will usually be the same.

Puppies that receive little or no human handling between the ages of eight and 16 weeks of age often remain fearful when exposed to new situations. Meeting their new family for the first time, the car ride to their new home, their first trip to the vet, and meeting children, strangers or other dogs for the first time can be extremely frightening for these puppies. We will never be able to affect puppies raised in the wild by an abandoned dog or by breeders who don't know how important it is to socialize their puppies.

What we can do is not allow our emotions to override good, rational thinking when making a decision about which puppy will make the best family pet. If you feel sorry for and want to select the shy puppy that avoids eye contact and doesn't want to be picked up, you may be setting yourself up for future problems.

How can we make sure the puppy we purchase will be well-socialized and become a good fit for our family? When surveying a puppy or litter of puppies more than 16 weeks of age that have had little human handling and are very shy and fearful, realize that they may always remain somewhat shy and fearful.

See a Problem?

If handled with kindness, patience and love, some of these puppies may learn to trust their family members but still remain somewhat fearful of strangers. A puppy acquired at eight weeks of age is more likely to become a well-adjusted family pet than one adopted at 16 weeks of age. Acquiring a puppy prior to eight weeks of age can also create problems.

These puppies miss out on important interactions that take place with other puppies in the litter. A puppy selected too young may miss out on the consequences of biting a littermate too hard. This puppy's new owners will then pay the price when it bites them too hard while playing. How do we get our puppies socialized so they grow up to be well-adjusted, adult dogs that are comfortable meeting strangers, children and other dogs? The key is to make sure your puppy gets exposed to everything he may ever be exposed to during his lifetime, while he is very young.

The critical age of socialization is between eight and 16 weeks of age. If not exposed to new situations during this critical period, your puppy may always be fearful when exposed to new things in the future. After you have chosen your new puppy and had it examined by your veterinarian, you can begin to expose it to new things. Your puppy will not have had all his vaccinations yet, but you may still take him to a family or neighbor's home to expose him to children or friendly, vaccinated dogs. If you have small children, dogs or cats in your family, you are fortunate.

Your puppy will become accustomed to the screaming and active play behavior of children and will be exposed to other pets. If you are a single adult, a couple without children or a senior citizen, you will have to go out of your way to expose your puppy to children of all ages.

You can invite well-mannered children into your home to have supervised play with your new puppy. If you don't know anyone with small children, you can often find families with children at local parks. Keep some tasty treats available for the children to give your puppy so he associates them with food rewards. When you have visitors come to your home, when the mailman delivers mail or the deliveryman brings packages, do the same thing.

Give them a dog treat, have them make your puppy sit, and then give the puppy the treat for sitting.