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Flidderbugs has 74 ratings and 31 reviews. Donna said: I live in a back to back terraced house. I know that my roof is well, I'm not actually sure wha.
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I also highly recommend this to politicians, hoping that they can learn from these little 'bugs that they are there to serve in the best interest of the people and not fight over inconsequential details. Sep 17, Emily rated it it was amazing. Flidderbugs is the story of Kriffle, a bug politician and rising heir to his father's position in public affairs in the great tree where all the Flidderbugs live. The issue on the table, of course, is whether the leaves on their tree have three points, or four.

It's the fundamental question that governs their lives, governs who's in power, governs everything. Kriffle knows that the leaves have three points, and anyone who thinks otherwise has to just be lying to the populace for nefarious purpos Flidderbugs is the story of Kriffle, a bug politician and rising heir to his father's position in public affairs in the great tree where all the Flidderbugs live.

Kriffle knows that the leaves have three points, and anyone who thinks otherwise has to just be lying to the populace for nefarious purposes. Hidden in that scuffle, though, is an allegory about fanatical devotion to ideology and about how small difference seem to be big when they're all anyone talks about. Fargeeta, Kriffle's uneasy ally in this foliage based debacle, puts it elegantly: They would never even consider that the truth is more complicated. At a quick 41 pages, this story is refreshing and attention-grabbing. Not quite a comedy, but still funny in that it resonates strongly of real-life scenarios, this is a good one to get people talking.

I can see this being used in a civics class to introduce a variety of topics in a new way, and to take some of the polarization out of these conversations. After reading Doodling I came into this story with high expectations, and I definitely wasn't disappointed. Dec 07, Amanda rated it really liked it Shelves: That has to be the most concise and accurate blurb I have ever seen for a book.


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On one level, Flidderbugs is a cute story that kids will enjoy. The Quadrigons and Triplifers are two tribes of bugs sharing one tree. Until disaster threatens and the bugs have to learn to work together. Adults can, of That has to be the most concise and accurate blurb I have ever seen for a book. Adults can, of course, enjoy that part of the story, as well.

Or they can appreciate the deeper messages. To these bugs, perception is more important than truth, even to those who know better. They have ridiculous divisions similar to our political, racial, and religious factions. They have one group of bugs who believe everything the government says, simply because the government says it. And then there is the group who is anti-government and refuses to believe anything the government says. No matter which side is in power.

Humans would never act like that. Hmmm…Any of that sound familiar?

Flidderbugs

I received this book free from the author in exchange for an honest review. Jan 02, Vered rated it liked it. The Krephiloff Tree is in trouble, but none of the Flidderbugs seem to realise just how much. Kriffle, a young Flidderbug, is convinced that all the trouble stems from the tribe of bugs, the Quadrigons, living on the other side of the tree, and all the members of his Triplifer tribe agree.

The trouble is that the other tribe knows that the leaves have four points, and are equally convinced that the Triplifers are misleading The Krephiloff Tree is in trouble, but none of the Flidderbugs seem to realise just how much. The trouble is that the other tribe knows that the leaves have four points, and are equally convinced that the Triplifers are misleading the bugs! And while the two tribes argue back and forth about what is true and who is lying, the situation gets worse. Gould has created a fantastical world with many clear and obvious parallels with our own.

Issues of social justice, sharing of resources, environmental degradation, imbalances and the importance of independent investigation of truth are explored in a light and engaging way. What I particularly love is the indirect exploration of two key issues underlying all these problems: In order to resolve a crisis, Kriffle and Fargeeta must overcome their prejudices and lead their tribes to a unified vision of the problem. But will they be able to do this in time to come up with a solution?

This story is particularly well suited for younger readers. Parents will also enjoy reading it to their children.

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Aug 31, Katy rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Kriffle and Fargeeta are the children of the leaders of the two opposing tribes, and they are being groomed to take over the leading roles since their respective fathers are aging. The question is — are there three points on each leaf, or four points? Each side will devoutly declare themselves as speaking the truth, and their opponents as lying. And why is the tree making such strange, rumbling noises lately? You have to read to find out.

The beauty of this story is its subtle poking at modern politics and religious dogma. Gould manages to tell an entertaining story and still get his ideas across quite clearly. Sep 01, Melissa rated it it was amazing. But what he discovers is shocking, and he must find a way to get all the Flidderbugs to work together—or face dire consequences. His stories are fun, thought-provoking, and always well written. Oh, and did I mention that I love the cover art for Flidderbugs? I really enjoyed this book. On the surface it's almost a children's story about warring bugs sharing one big tree and it certainly could be read like that.

It's really a political satire and it's very reflective of what's currently going on in the political atmosphere right now. Disagreement, stagnation, and at times, chaos. This book was especially poignant considering the things going on in my country the United States like the party divide in Congress, which makes it impossible to get a lot I really enjoyed this book. This book was especially poignant considering the things going on in my country the United States like the party divide in Congress, which makes it impossible to get a lot done and the GOP primaries that are currently being carried out in a grueling manner all over the country..

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I'm not sure if Gould based the story off of his own country's struggles but this book is broader than just one country. There are two tribes of Flidderbugs who live in the same tree. Neither one can agree on basic things like how many points the leaves of their tree has sounds a lot like Congress, no. Will the bugs ever figure out how silly their argument is. I liked this story because in a fairly simplistic way, Gould is able to show us how crazy politics are and how much better things could be if we just try to get along and at least understand where each other are coming from.

Jan 29, Tricia Kristufek rated it really liked it Shelves: Because everybody knows that the leaves on the Krephiloff Tree had three points. But they also had four points too. Kriffle of the Triplifer tribe is preparing to take over his father's position as leader of their tribe. He struggles to get to the Fleedenhall due to all the leaves clogging up his home. Leaves in his broth, leaves burying him at night while he sleeps, leaves everywhere! Kriffle knows he must win this debate and get elected so that his side of the Tree can use the Shears. Kriffle kn Because everybody knows that the leaves on the Krephiloff Tree had three points.

Kriffle knows the leaves on his side of the Tree have three points. In his frustration, he drags his protesting rival, Fargeeta of the Quadrigon tribe, over to his side of the tree. Fargeeta then takes him to her side, showing him the impossible: But even after he finds out that the other side's leaves have four points, he has a hard time getting anyone to listen to him, and so Kriffle and Fargeeta vow to get to the root of the issue. Don't let this cute story fool you - there's much more going on under the surface.

Flidderbugs (English Edition) eBook: Jonathan Gould: wesatimunogo.cf: Kindle Store

Gould does a wonderful job creating these characters that even children will love, and their parents can dig deeper for satirical layers reminiscent of Dr. Seuss - with less rhymes. Dec 05, Vickie rated it it was amazing. Either a tale of two tribes of beetles who just can't agree or a reflection of modern-day politics and power struggles, complete with some wheeling and dealing. Our hero, Kriffle, lives in the Krephiloff Tree and his father, Proggle, is the leader of the Triplifers. He has high hopes for his son in political debate in the aptly named Fleedenhall.

The Triplifers live on one side of the tree. On the other live their long adversaries, the Quadrigons. The beliefs of the two are at loggerheads, poised on the question of how many points have the leaves on the tree. The ideas behind the cute surface story are brilliant. The bug characters are great. I was rooting for Kriffle as he went on his search for the truth, meeting many other bugs along the way, including the daunting Fargeeta of the Quadrigons. At the end I was left wondering what happened next to Kriffle as he was a pretty neat little beetle hero. Jan 02, Lynn Hallbrooks rated it it was amazing Shelves: I was first introduced to Flidderbugs on Independent Authors and Writers where I thought the post about it was impressive enough to make it "book of the day": We'll publish them on our site once we've reviewed them.

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We appreciate your feedback. I was impressed to see that Gould managed to include a fair number of encounters and adventures as Kriffle explores his society without having to cut out any of the required detail. In regards to the characters, it was nice to see that the Flidderbugs all had such distinct and fleshed out personalities. I could understand very quickly what the various individuals were all about which was vitally important when the story is being told in the form of a novella. Overall, I found this to a quick and fun political satire that provided me with a hopeful ending rather than the usual depressing finales seen in many other novels that touch on the same satirical subject matter.

If you enjoy satire then I suspect you will like this novella, I know that I was happy to find myself laughing at myself when I realised that I had fallen into some of the same traps as the Flidderbugs. CathyS on April 11, Jonathan is one of the most creative writers I have come across.

This is my third after Doodling and Magnus Opum encounter with this talented author and he never ceases to amaze me. A very important and divisive issue separates the two groups — does a leaf have three or four points? It takes the offspring Kriffle and Fargeeta of the elders, who have long held council, to bring a refreshing new outlook to proceedings and to make them see the error of the traditionally held beliefs; but they have to act quickly — three points or four on a leaf will make no difference when there is a much more serious and urgent dilemma needing immediate attention.

A captivating short book, with a witty satirical edge that was a delight to read. The author has a fabulous knack of combining acerbic lampooning with an entertaining yarn. Donna Brown on Nov. I live in a back to back terraced house. I know that my roof is But say it was blue. That should mean that my neighbour's roof is also blue, right? But what if they KNOW they their roof is pink? When I opened Flidderbugs and read the first couple of lines, Orwell's immediately came to mind, more specifically Minitrue aka The Ministry of Truth.

In truth, my associations weren't too farfetched: Flidderbugs is an interesting tale of what we know versus what we believe. Do we believe something because we know it to be the case? Or do we know something because it fits in with our beliefs? Can politics, like religion, prevent us from approaching situations logically? And is it always in our best interest to listen to the information that is fed to us from those who - allegedly - know better?

Doodling, Gould's first title and a Goodreads Choice Awards: Best Humor semi finalist , was a fabulously fun read with a heavy smattering of satire. Flidderbugs takes satire to a whole new level. Yet its real genius lies not in that but in the fact that you don't actually realise the strength of the messages until you've completed the book. Flidderbugs simply seems like a good read saving initial Orwellian thoughts but it's the period after you've closed the final page or put down your ereader that the heavy thinking kicks in.

What an amazing achievement: More please, Mr Gould. Nambatac Jr on Nov. Alex Canton-Dutari on Sep. Half the world doesn't know how the counterpart lives, and not always by lack of travel but by direct, manipulated distortion of reality. I found this to be a book about politics, distorted science and sociology, better transmitted to us human readers by animal characters, with which we tend to identify since childhood.

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This is, definitely, my kind of book: David Green on Sep. Flidderbugs is a quirky short tale about two opposing tribes of bugs that live in the Krephiloff Tree. The major argument between themselves is whether the leaves have three or four points to them. Little do they know that just around the corner is real danger to their very existence and the two opposing tribes will have to overcome their differences if they are to survive.

Although this is a short story it comes with a big message.