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Literature and Dogma , Arnold's major work in religious criticism appeared in Arnold died suddenly in of heart failure whilst running to meet a tram that would have taken him to the Liverpool Landing Stage to see his daughter, who was visiting from the United States where she had moved after marrying an American. Arnold died in June Russell in Portraits of the Seventies , is "a man of the world entirely free from worldliness and a man of letters without the faintest trace of pedantry ".

He read constantly, widely, and deeply, and in the intervals of supporting himself and his family by the quiet drudgery of school inspecting, filled notebook after notebook with meditations of an almost monastic tone. In his writings, he often baffled and sometimes annoyed his contemporaries by the apparent contradiction between his urbane, even frivolous manner in controversy, and the "high seriousness" of his critical views and the melancholy, almost plaintive note of much of his poetry.

Warren's description of him. In an letter to his mother, he wrote:. My poems represent, on the whole, the main movement of mind of the last quarter of a century, and thus they will probably have their day as people become conscious to themselves of what that movement of mind is, and interested in the literary productions which reflect it.

It might be fairly urged that I have less poetical sentiment than Tennyson and less intellectual vigour and abundance than Browning; yet because I have perhaps more of a fusion of the two than either of them, and have more regularly applied that fusion to the main line of modern development, I am likely enough to have my turn as they have had theirs. Stefan Collini regards this as "an exceptionally frank, but not unjust, self-assessment. Arnold's poetry continues to have scholarly attention lavished upon it, in part because it seems to furnish such striking evidence for several central aspects of the intellectual history of the nineteenth century, especially the corrosion of 'Faith' by 'Doubt'.

No poet, presumably, would wish to be summoned by later ages merely as an historical witness, but the sheer intellectual grasp of Arnold's verse renders it peculiarly liable to this treatment. Harold Bloom echoes Arnold's self-characterization in his introduction as series editor to the Modern Critical Views volume on Arnold: Whatever his achievement as a critic of literature, society, or religion, his work as a poet may not merit the reputation it has continued to hold in the twentieth century.

Arnold is, at his best, a very good but highly derivative poet As with Tennyson, Hopkins, and Rossetti, Arnold's dominant precursor was Keats , but this is an unhappy puzzle, since Arnold unlike the others professed not to admire Keats greatly, while writing his own elegiac poems in a diction, meter, imagistic procedure, that are embarrassingly close to Keats.

Sir Edmund Chambers noted, however, that "in a comparison between the best works of Matthew Arnold and that of his six greatest contemporaries He has a primary school named after him in Liverpool, where he died, and secondary schools named after him in Oxford and Staines. His literary career — leaving out the two prize poems — had begun in with the publication of The Strayed Reveller and Other Poems by A.

It contained what is perhaps Arnold's most purely poetical poem, "The Forsaken Merman. In he published his tragedy of Merope, calculated, he wrote to a friend, "rather to inaugurate my Professorship with dignity than to move deeply the present race of humans," and chiefly remarkable for some experiments in unusual — and unsuccessful — metres. His poem, " Dover Beach ," depicted a nightmarish world from which the old religious verities have receded.

It is sometimes held up as an early, if not the first, example of the modern sensibility. In a famous preface to a selection of the poems of William Wordsworth , Arnold identified, a little ironically, as a "Wordsworthian. It has also been quoted or alluded to in a variety of other contexts see Dover Beach. Some consider Arnold to be the bridge between Romanticism and Modernism.

His use of symbolic landscapes was typical of the Romantic era, while his sceptical and pessimistic perspective was typical of the Modern era. The rationalistic tendency of certain of his writings gave offence to many readers, and the sufficiency of his equipment in scholarship for dealing with some of the subjects which he handled was called in question, but he undoubtedly exercised a stimulating influence on his time.

His writings are characterised by the finest culture, high purpose, sincerity, and a style of great distinction, and much of his poetry has an exquisite and subtle beauty, though here also it has been doubted whether high culture and wide knowledge of poetry did not sometimes take the place of true poetic fire. Henry James wrote that Matthew Arnold's poetry will appeal to those who "like their pleasures rare" and who like to hear the poet "taking breath. The mood of Arnold's poetry tends to be of plaintive reflection, and he is restrained in expressing emotion.

He felt that poetry should be the 'criticism of life' and express a philosophy. Arnold's philosophy is that true happiness comes from within, and that people should seek within themselves for good, while being resigned in acceptance of outward things and avoiding the pointless turmoil of the world. However, he argues that we should not live in the belief that we shall one day inherit eternal bliss. If we are not happy on earth, we should moderate our desires rather than live in dreams of something that may never be attained.

This philosophy is clearly expressed in such poems as "Dover Beach" and in these lines from "Stanzas from the Grande Chartreuse":. Wandering between two worlds, one dead The other powerless to be born, With nowhere yet to rest my head Like these, on earth I wait forlorn. Arnold valued natural scenery for its peace and permanence in contrast with the ceaseless change of human things. His descriptions are often picturesque, and marked by striking similes.

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However, at the same time he liked subdued colours, mist and moonlight. He seems to prefer the 'spent lights' of the sea-depths in "The Forsaken Merman" to the village life preferred by the merman's lost wife. In his poetry he derived not only the subject matter of his narrative poems from various traditional or literary sources but even much of the romantic melancholy of his earlier poems from Senancour 's "Obermann". Assessing the importance of Arnold's prose work in , Stefan Collini stated, "for reasons to do with our own cultural preoccupations as much as with the merits of his writing, the best of his prose has a claim on us today that cannot be matched by his poetry.

George Watson follows George Saintsbury in dividing Arnold's career as a prose writer into three phases: More recent writers, such as Collini, have shown a greater interest in his social writing, [21] while over the years a significant second tier of criticism has focused on Arnold's religious writing. Selections from the Prose Work of Matthew Arnold [24]. Arnold's work as a literary critic began with the "Preface to the Poems". In it, he attempted to explain his extreme act of self-censorship in excluding the dramatic poem "Empedocles on Etna".

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With its emphasis on the importance of subject in poetry, on "clearness of arrangement, rigor of development, simplicity of style" learned from the Greeks, and in the strong imprint of Goethe and Wordsworth, may be observed nearly all the essential elements in his critical theory. George Watson described the preface, written by the thirty-one-year-old Arnold, as "oddly stiff and graceless when we think of the elegance of his later prose.

Criticism began to take first place in Arnold's writing with his appointment in to the professorship of poetry at Oxford, which he held for two successive terms of five years. In his lectures On Translating Homer were published, to be followed in by Last Words on Translating Homer , both volumes admirable in style and full of striking judgments and suggestive remarks, but built on rather arbitrary assumptions and reaching no well-established conclusions.

Although Arnold's poetry received only mixed reviews and attention during his lifetime, his forays into literary criticism were more successful. Arnold is famous for introducing a methodology of literary criticism somewhere between the historicist approach common to many critics at the time and the personal essay; he often moved quickly and easily from literary subjects to political and social issues.

His Essays in Criticism , , remains a significant influence on critics to this day, and his prefatory essay to that collection, "The Function of Criticism at the Present Time", is one of the most influential essays written on the role of the critic in identifying and elevating literature — even while admitting, "The critical power is of lower rank than the creative. He considered the most important criteria used to judge the value of a poem were "high truth" and "high seriousness".

By this standard, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales did not merit Arnold's approval. Further, Arnold thought the works that had been proven to possess both "high truth" and "high seriousness", such as those of Shakespeare and Milton, could be used as a basis of comparison to determine the merit of other works of poetry.

He also sought for literary criticism to remain disinterested, and said that the appreciation should be of "the object as in itself it really is. He was led on from literary criticism to a more general critique of the spirit of his age. Between and he wrote Culture and Anarchy , famous for the term he popularised for the middle class of the English Victorian era population: Culture and Anarchy is also famous for its popularisation of the phrase "sweetness and light," first coined by Jonathan Swift.

Arnold's "want of logic and thoroughness of thought" as noted by John M. Robertson in Modern Humanists was an aspect of the inconsistency of which Arnold was accused. Arnold must be added; the son's fundamental likeness to the father was early pointed out by Swinburne , and was later attested by Matthew Arnold's grandson, Mr. In , Arnold was credited with coining the phrase "New Journalism", a term that went on to define an entire genre of newspaper history, particularly Lord Northcliffe's turn-of-the-century press empire. However, at the time, the target of Arnold's irritation was not Northcliffe , but the sensational journalism of Pall Mall Gazette editor, W.

As an occasional contributor, he had formed a particular friendship with its first editor, Frederick Greenwood and a close acquaintance with its second, John Morley. But he strongly disapproved of the muck-raking Stead , and declared that, under Stead, "the P. His religious views were unusual for his time.

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Scholars of Arnold's works disagree on the nature of Arnold's personal religious beliefs. Under the influence of Baruch Spinoza and his father, Dr. Thomas Arnold, he rejected the supernatural elements in religion, even while retaining a fascination for church rituals. Arnold seems to belong to a middle ground that is more concerned with the poetry of religion and its virtues and values for society than with the existence of God. Advanced Search Find a Library. Your list has reached the maximum number of items.

Canzonets for two and three voices (Musical score, ) [wesatimunogo.cf]

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Canzonets for two and three voices Author: American agents, Galaxy Music Corp. English madrigalists , 1.

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Go ye, my canzonets. When, lo, by break of morning. Sweet nymph, come to thy lover. I go before, my darling. Lo, here another love. Leave now, mine eyes.