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Designed for screenwriters, novelists, and movie fans, this book gives readers the key breakdowns of the 50 most instructional movies from the past 30 years. Read more Read less. Zhejiang University Press August 1, Language: Be the first to review this item Amazon Best Sellers Rank: Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video. Customer reviews There are no customer reviews yet. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. There's a problem loading this menu right now. Get fast, free shipping with Amazon Prime.

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Get to Know Us. English Choose a language for shopping. Amazon Music Stream millions of songs. Then almos This book walks you through 50 genres, 10 with 5 sub-genres each as defined by Blake in the second chapter of his first STC book. Then almost aligning to the minute, there are false victory parties, key information reveals, and deaths. For each of the 50 sub-genres, there is an overlayed beat sheet for one film as an example template bundled with a short list of cousin films that would follow in the same conventions.

I revisit chapters of this whenever I kick off a new idea, depending on where it lands in terms of genre s. After all, even if you're of the rebel frame of mind. You can't break the rules constructively, without first understanding what they are and their purpose. Blake's passion and enthusiasm were clearly apparent in his three books, through his conversational tone and bursting need to inspire. A great asset, for sure. Jul 29, Kirstie rated it really liked it Shelves: The break downs of the 'genres' are well thought out and give you a deeper understanding of what makes that type of story work, and having the plots of multiple films in each of the genres broken down helps you really absorb the information.

It was frustrating however that in these plot break downs the characters were often referred to by the actor name which left me confused frequently. That's my only complaint though. A good book for writers of any kind Sep 20, Jocelyn rated it really liked it. The book and series are great, and super interesting and informative even for casual readers with no screenwriting experience. This book was no different, and the only flies in the ointment were Blake's inability to pass opportunities to toot his own horn, and his inconsistent and confusing switch in the Beat Sheets between the actor and character names.

Being an ignorant millennial I've only seen 12 of the 50 movies listed, so I had to re-read the Beat Sheets multiple times to understand which The book and series are great, and super interesting and informative even for casual readers with no screenwriting experience.

Being an ignorant millennial I've only seen 12 of the 50 movies listed, so I had to re-read the Beat Sheets multiple times to understand which characters he was referring to. Oct 19, Bob Anderson rated it liked it. If you are not familiar with Save the Cat! In this book, he goes scene by scene through a good many hit movies, showing how each of them fall into their more generic story structure once you pick apart and label their elements. Snyder makes sure to use a variety of genres for each story ar If you are not familiar with Save the Cat!

Snyder makes sure to use a variety of genres for each story archetype, seeming to enjoy applying the idea to less obvious works. I have already used this method and would suggest it to any screenwriter out there.

I'm in the business of writing for comic books and Blake Snyder's books have always been a go to keeper book for research. When ever I fill like I've written myself into a corner, I can step back and review the basics with all of his books. Goes to the Movies is a great resource when looking for some examples of scripts that follow the beats that make a complete story. Jul 15, Kameron Mitchell rated it really liked it Shelves: This one is definitely a necessary companion to the first, in my opinion. Oct 27, Rebecca rated it liked it Shelves: Examples of the formula outlined in the first book.

I enjoyed reading about the movies I've seen; many I haven't seen. Aug 05, Renee Gurley rated it it was amazing. I don't normally become a fanatic, but when I do, it's for anything Save the Cat Dec 09, Lynn Davidson rated it liked it Shelves: To be honest, I didn't finish this book. It is about beats and rhythms on story building, and is based on many movies.

Save the Cat! Goes to the Movies: The Screenwriter's Guide to Every Story Ever Told by Blake Snyder

Interesting but it is not the reading I am personally interested in right now. Jun 08, Todd Stockslager rated it really liked it Shelves: Fun peak behind the curtain of the craft of screenwriting is interesting to the layman because of the structure it lends to the movies that are our most ubiquitous entertainment.

Our hours in the dark lend the usually mistaken notion we are qualified to judge and analyze scripts. Snyder gives us tools for doing so, and even writing our own if we have the muse and the motivation to try. Snyder reprises the common plot elements he identified in the original "Save the Cat" book that are part of ev Fun peak behind the curtain of the craft of screenwriting is interesting to the layman because of the structure it lends to the movies that are our most ubiquitous entertainment. Snyder reprises the common plot elements he identified in the original "Save the Cat" book that are part of every good screenplay, and proceeds to demonstrate how these plot elements are used in a list of 10 main "genres" story types that account for every story ever told, as the subtitle claims.

He picks a recent popular movie in each genre and subgenre about 50 in all to provide a complete "beat by beat" summary of the plot, and lists cousins--other movies that use the same story. For example, one genre is the "whydunit"--so-called by Snyder because the key thing the audience and the producers want to know is not who, but why. Every whydunit has --a detective, someone attempting to uncover the why; that someone may even be us, the audience , --a secret, the thing we need to know that is more important than money, sex, power, or fame and --a dark turn, a point in the plot when the detective will break rules, putting himself at risk, to uncover this powerful secret The subgenres are the --Political Whydunit, exemplified by "All the President's Men" --Fantasy Whydunit, exemplified by "Blade Runner" --Cop Whydunit, exempleified by "Fargo" --Personal Whydunit, exempleified by "Mystic River" --Noir Whydunit, exemplified by "Brick" Snyder is a screenwriter himself, and wrote the original "Save the Cat" a term used to describe an act in the screen play that shows the audience the worth of the hero, as when the hero rescues a cat from a tree as a guide for screenwriters.

This sequel helps make sense of the framework, especially for us nonprofessionals. There is also software that provides templates for screenwriters to help them to write their own sellable scripts. The best-selling Save the Cat has become a standard companion for professionals, and it is now a fun tool for the many interested amateurs among us. Mar 06, Gerald rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: You won't find the traditional genres "action-adventure" or "romantic comedy" here.

Synder swaps those for genre-predicaments like "Monster in the House" and "Dude with a Problem" he identifies ten of them as the engines of all hits. He then decomposes the plots of several blockbusters to show how that engine operates in each one. His insights are fascinating because, without the distinction of genre as he defines it, you might assume that "Three Days of the Condor" and "Sleeping with the Enem You won't find the traditional genres "action-adventure" or "romantic comedy" here. His insights are fascinating because, without the distinction of genre as he defines it, you might assume that "Three Days of the Condor" and "Sleeping with the Enemy" are fundamentally different.

By traditional definitions, one is a spy thriller and the other is a woman-jeopardy thriller. But in the gospel according to Blake, those two movies are twins.

Knowing why will not only make you a better screenwriter but will also give you a better appreciation of the high art of crafting those blockbusters that almost never win the snob awards. Taking Synder's distinction one step further, it should be possible to do a "Monster in the House" story in any of the traditional genres--action-adventure, horror, or even romantic comedy!

Getting this basic idea will help you understand why "King Kong" owes so much to "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" not one of Snyder's examples, but one I'm sure he'd acknowledge. Do get this book if you are writing spec scripts. But if you are writing indies, proceed with caution--with any book on structure. Certainly the gurus will preach that the rules of structure can strengthen any story and that, at the very least, you should master the rules before you break them. But you don't want to get so locked into the box of rules that you can't think outside of it. The goal in indies, in my humble opinion, should not be to make blockbusters on the cheap but to take risks and evolve the cinematic form in ways the studios won't.

I should disclose that I have met Blake Snyder, and he is as charming in person as he is engaging on the page. More important, he assured me that no cats were harmed in the making of his books! Aug 20, Patricia J. I read the second book Save the Cat! I write novels, but a lot can be learned about compelling storytelling from movies. Goes to the Movies is still full of insights useful to any writer. Snyder identifies story types and gives example I read the second book Save the Cat!

Snyder identifies story types and gives examples of movies that fit these structures: I think the message here is not so much there are only a certain number of plotlines that exist in the world, but that a story needs a rock-solid structure first and then can vary the rest of the details. Otherwise, writers run the risk of being wishy-washy, not able to pinpoint in their pitch and, later, to readers what their story really is about. If you have trouble identifying which of the categories your story fits, Snyder lists elements that should be there.

For instance, under Rites of Passage, it is the hero who must change, not the world around him. Buddy Love requires an incomplete hero who needs another to be whole. There are lots of valuable tips. The first Save the Cat! But rather than be a critique that all movies are roughly the same, Snyder provided there a kind of skeleton to build your original plots around.

It was very helpful knowing that around page 25, for example, it's time to break into Act 2, and what that means. This sequel reinforces concepts of the first book with examples of real movies. It's a good complement to that first book, but by no means should you read this one f The first Save the Cat! It's a good complement to that first book, but by no means should you read this one first or as a standalone. To be honest, I missed the more "how-to" tone of the first book when reading this one. Examples are great, but it doesn't make as interesting a read. And Snyder goes through each film pretty quickly.

This might have worked better if I was actually watching each movie just before reading his breakdown, but I just didn't have the time for that.

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Overall a useful book for the aspiring screenwriter, but definitely read the first Save the Cat! Mar 24, Susan added it Shelves: In terms of the writing itself it's not the most well-written, but the layout and language are both straightforward and easy to understand. Although I don't agree with all of the analyses this book has been excellent for introducing a set of vocabulary that I can use to describe the structure behind the plot of movies, as well a good idea of what structure actually IS, which can translate to scripts not only for movies, but other areas as well which is the main reason I picked up this book.

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I In terms of the writing itself it's not the most well-written, but the layout and language are both straightforward and easy to understand. I ended up skipping a lot of the analysis of the different movies for reasons mentioned i. Nov 13, CC rated it really liked it. He breaks down scripts so you don't have to.

Save the Cat! Goes to the Movies: The Screenwriter's Guide to Every Story Ever Told

It's a good way get the gist of overall structure at a glance, and for that I'll give it four stars. This is more than likely because the listed movies do not follow the strict page formula Blake Snyder created in Save The Cat. It doesn't matter, necessarily, as He breaks down scripts so you don't have to. It doesn't matter, necessarily, as this book is much more general and meant to give you the beats in a sweeping fashion. However, it is further evidence that screenwriting needs to come from an organic place, rather than striving to collect an arsenal of manufactured plot points to throw on page 55, so you can "win.

There are no discussion topics on this book yet. In his year career as a screenwriter and producer, Blake Snyder has sold dozens of scripts, including co-writing Blank Check , which became a hit for Disney, and Nuclear Family for Steven Spielberg. His book, Save the Cat! It has prompted "standing room only" appearances by Blake in In his year career as a screenwriter and producer, Blake Snyder has sold dozens of scripts, including co-writing Blank Check , which became a hit for Disney, and Nuclear Family for Steven Spielberg.

Apparently it is not quite the last book on screenwriting youll ever need, as the eagerly awaited sequel, Save the Cat! Blake's method has become the "secret weapon" of many development executives, managers, and producers for its precise, easy, and honest appraisal of what it takes to write and develop stories that resonate.

Blake is a member of the Writers Guild of America, west. With Save the Cat! Goes to the Movies Snyder is determined to set a collective new dialogue about the realities of professional screenwriting; this is exactly what his sincere and heartfelt books set out to do and accomplishes. Snyder once again takes his place as one of the most successful, visionary, accessible, pragmatic screenwriters who writes about the craft of all time.