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Editorial Reviews. Review. ""A lively and erudite look into the culinary proclivities of the dudes The Founding Foodies: How Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin Revolutionized American Cuisine - Kindle edition by Dave DeWitt. Download it.
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Like many of today's foodies, the Founding Fathers were ardent supporters of sustainable farming and ranching, exotic imported foods, brewing, distilling, and wine appreciation. Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin penned original recipes, encouraged local production of beer and wine, and shared their delight in food with friends and fellow politicians. In The Founding Foodies , food writer Dave DeWitt entertainingly describes how some of America's most famous colonial leaders not only established America's political destiny, but also revolutionized the very foods we eat.

This incredibly interesting and fun book combines three of my favorite subjects: Often, Thomas Jefferson makes me laugh. I feel like maybe he was a little delusional about the way he lived his life and the way he wanted people to THINK he lived his life.

This one looks like great fun. That part about the kitchen dogs was new to me. It sounds horrid for many reasons. Sounds like a really fun book. How fun it would have been to hang out in Philly at a tavern during the Constitutional Congress Days. Spirited discussions the rule. You read the MOST fascinating books!! Have you read At Home by Bryson? I think I might truly enjoy it! You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email.

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About rhapsodyinbooks We're into reading, politics, and intellectual exchanges. This entry was posted in Book Review and tagged Book Review. Peggy Peggy Ann's Post says: This book was an easy read and combined two things I really love - history and food. It reveals a lot about how certain foods became "american" as well as some historical background as to the why.

No Jefferson did not invent ice cream, but his recipe is included which makes the book all the more fun. There is also a listing of restaurants and places to visit. Of the five restaurants listed, I have eanted and 3 and loved each one. Enjoy or perhaps Bon appetit! Jul 20, Apryl Anderson rated it liked it Shelves: Interesting survey of colonial American agriculture and culinary habits. It makes me want to visit each of the historic homes for more in-depth study, and I celebrate the American living-museum culture!

Righting the Record: Conservatism and the Archives

I've found the curators to be so engaged and engaging—something that few European curators seem to have mastered, although that's happily changing away from traditional Ivory Tower lordship of knowledge. The recipes presented are also an overview of the wealth that is available to those who google Interesting survey of colonial American agriculture and culinary habits. The recipes presented are also an overview of the wealth that is available to those who google. Project Gutenberg, for instance, offers Jul 31, Rebecca rated it it was ok Shelves: I found this book to be very badly organized and very chaotically written.

The facts about American cuisine were interesting but DeWitt likes rightly so I think to contextualize changes in food and agricultural practices with the political and social scene at the time and he gets A LOT of basic facts wrong.

Nothing that seems major to the larger story he's telling but it certainly bothered me and it calls into question his research skills. I was not very impressed by this book. Jul 27, Christina added it Shelves: This book could have benefitted from some stronger organization- at times it read like a first draft, and the story skipped around a bit. That being said, I thought this was an enjoyable read and I learned a lot about the Founding Fathers and their food habits. I always find culinary histories to be incredibly interesting my all time favorite is still A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression and I never knew about most of what this book covers, like Jefferson's numerous attemp This book could have benefitted from some stronger organization- at times it read like a first draft, and the story skipped around a bit.

A Culinary History of the Great Depression and I never knew about most of what this book covers, like Jefferson's numerous attempts to grow European varietals of wine or the lavish, extensive dinner parties the Washingtons threw at Mount Vernon. I appreciated that the author included a lot of original recipes from the period, too, and modernized a good amount to make them a bit easier for readers to make. Dec 02, Lindsey Duncan rated it really liked it. An entertaining look at the early history of food in America and the Founding Fathers who were greatly influential in its development, this book was full of delightful information.

The period recipes, presented verbatim, are fun to read - and definitely give you an appreciation for modern cookbooks, because I would hate to try to follow one. Be aware that book is perhaps mistitled; the first segment of it a significant portion of the book is not so much about founding foodies as it is about th An entertaining look at the early history of food in America and the Founding Fathers who were greatly influential in its development, this book was full of delightful information.

Be aware that book is perhaps mistitled; the first segment of it a significant portion of the book is not so much about founding foodies as it is about the early economy, necessity and evolution of food, from the explosion of the pepper trade in Salem to the duties of the baker-general of George Washington's army.

The Founding Foodies: How Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin Revolutionized American Cuisine

This is not a general history book - it is an in-depth analysis of American eating, and includes a lot of elements we often take for granted nowadays, such as the requirements imposed by geography and the creation of a national identity. The chapters that focus specifically on Washington and Jefferson are really well-balanced, providing a general sense of their lives and historical high-points, while keeping the focus on the real star on the story: For me, where this book falls down is the translation of recipes at the end of the book.

The author has attempted to modernize the recipes, but the result seems half-hearted at best, both in the product and the methodology used to arrive at these interpretations. To be honest, I would have been perfectly content - might have even enjoyed it better - to have another few chapters, looking at some of the other early culinarians, rather than the recipes.

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This kind of a project really requires an entire book to itself - perhaps even for each individual region for instance, New England fare versus Jefferson's Virginia , never mind the whole Revolutionary landscape; it's not really suited to be squashed into 46 pages. Still, as a reading book rather than a recipe book, highly recommended. If you love the story behind the food, this is for you. Jan 03, Julieann Wielga rated it really liked it. Jefferson and Franklin traveled widely traveleld widely in Europe.

They brought home ideas about unusual foods. Jefferson was a gardener and fascinated by the science of plants. He tried many non-native plants in america such as Olive Trees. He was a huge fan of wine. He had his half brother-in-law, James Hemmings, as his cook in Paris. James become a honored Parisian cook and brought the knowledge of how to make these delicassies, sauses to America.

Jefferson as governor and president hosted ge Jefferson and Franklin traveled widely traveleld widely in Europe. Jefferson as governor and president hosted generous dinner parties as part of his role as politicain. Washington traveled less, but was a tremendous farmer. He experimented with different crops as to which would give the greatest profit.

He made mills to grind the grain A small aside was how the author dealt with the question of what both Washington and Jefferson did with their cooks. Washington's well known and accomplised chef Washington escaped from the plantation, and to Washington's dismay was never heard from again. Jefferson's cook James, returned to slave status when he returned to America with Jefferson. He eventually became an alcoholic and committed suicide. Nov 13, Casey Wheeler rated it really liked it Shelves: I came across this book in the gift shop of the National Archives during our recent trip to Washington, DC.

It intrigued me as I am now in the food banking world and I am a history buff. The subtitle of the book, "How Washington, Jefferson and Franklin Revolutionized American Cuisine", pretty well summarizes what the book is about. The author focused much more on Washington and Jefferson than Franklin as they both were also experimental farmers whereas Franklin was not.

The book is filled with col I came across this book in the gift shop of the National Archives during our recent trip to Washington, DC. The book is filled with colonial recipes for all types of food and drink.